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New Gallup Poll Shows Marriage Equality Support at 60%

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Gallup Poll

Last year, we reported that nationwide approval for same-sex marriage had reached an all-time high according to Gallup, which then found that 55% of Americans support same-sex marriage. Those numbers have soared even higher in the 12 months since, now reaching 60% approval on the eve of the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriage. As Gallup reports, support for same-sex marriage is also at an all-time high among both major political parties:

Though same-sex marriage continues to be politically divisive, support for its legal status has reached new highs among Americans of all political stripes — with Democrats at 76% support, independents at 64% and Republicans at 37%. […]

The party divide between Democrats and Republicans may hinge largely on the age groups that compose each party. Gallup has found that younger Americans are significantly more likely to lean Democratic, while older Americans skew Republican. And while majorities of each age group under 65 support marriage equality in 2015, those aged 65 and older are still more likely to oppose it. This is a new phenomenon for the 50- to 64-year-old group. Last year, just 48% of these middle-aged Americans supported legally recognizing gay marriage. But in 2015, this figure has climbed to a majority of 54%.

Authored By Sean Mandell – See the Full Story at Towleroad.com

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Presbyterian Church Approves Marriage Equality

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Presbyterian ChurchAfter three decades of debate over its stance on homosexuality, members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) voted on Tuesday to change the definition of marriage in the church’s constitution to include same-sex marriage.

The final approval by a majority of the church’s 171 regional bodies, known as presbyteries, enshrines a change recommended last year by the church’s General Assembly. The vote amends the church’s constitution to broaden marriage from being between “a man and a woman” to “two people, traditionally a man and a woman.”

The Presbytery of the Palisades, meeting in Fair Lawn, N.J., put the ratification count over the top on Tuesday on a voice vote. With many presbyteries still left to vote, the tally late Tuesday stood at 87 presbyteries in favor, 41 against and one tied.

Authored By Laurie Goodstein – See the Full Story at The New York Times

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42% in US Think Gays Are Born That Way

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

titleA new Gallup poll shows we still have a long way to go on public education about gays and lesbians.

The Washington Post reports:

Are people born gay or lesbian, are do they become that way due to their upbringing or environment? Though opinions are changing, it turns that America is still deeply divided on this “nature vs. nurture” question. Gallup polls taken over nearly four decades show a sharp rise in the view that people are born gay or lesbian, from about 12 percent in 1977 to 42 percent in 2014. The percentage of people saying that homosexuality is due to a person’s upbringing or environment has fallen, from more than 50 percent in the late 1970s to less than 40 percent today.

Gallup Poll on Homosexuality

Unfortunately, the poll shows a bit of a drop-off since last year.

New Poll: US Marriage Equality Support At 59%

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

titleA new poll pegs US support for marriage equality at 59%.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Support for gay marriage has risen to an all-time high in the latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, reinforcing it as one of the fastest-moving changes in social attitudes of this generation. The new survey found that 59% of Americans support allowing same-sex marriage, nearly double the 30% support reported in 2004. Fred Yang, the Democratic pollster who conducted the survey with Republican Bill McInturff said public opinion about gay marriage is changing at a much more rapid rate than did the nation’s attitudes toward interracial marriage, which now is supported by 87% of Americans.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL poll

More than a third of conservatives now support it, and 3/4ths of Democrats do.

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US Marriage Equality Support Jumps to 63%

Friday, February 20th, 2015

titleAccording to a new poll, marriage equality support continues to increase as more and more states get it.

On Top Magazine reports:

A CNN/ORC poll released Thursday showed 63 percent of Americans support gay couples’ constitutional right to marry. According to the poll of 1,027 adults conducted February 12-15, 63 percent of Americans believe that gay couples have “a constitutional right to get married and have their marriage recognized by law as valid,” while 36 percent remain opposed. Seventy-two percent of adults under age 34 favor marriage equality. A large majority (75%) of Democrats see marriage for gays as a constitutional right, while 42 percent of Republicans agree.

Only 36% are now opposed – remarkable progress in just a few years.

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USA: New Poll Says 60% of Likely Voters Support Marriage Equality

Friday, February 13th, 2015

titleA new poll from HRC shows a heightened level of support for marriage equality among likely voters.

Politico reports:

With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to rule this spring on whether same-sex couples nationwide should have the right to marry, a gay rights organization on Friday released a new survey showing support for gay marriage at 60 percent among likely voters in the 2016 election. The Human Rights Campaign — a Washington, D.C.-based tax-exempt nonprofit that works to “achieve equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans” — says its survey shows conservatives who claim the country will balk at court-imposed marriage rights are out of step with public opinion. The poll was conducted late last month by the Democratic polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research. According to the survey, 60 percent of likely voters say they favor “allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally,” while 37 percent oppose allowing gays to marry.

While the poll measures likely voters vs. people in general, it’s still a great number to see.

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The Marriage Equality Cases Before the US Supreme Court

Friday, January 30th, 2015

US Supreme Court ColorLast time, we spoke about the importance of framing the case through the Questions Presented. I argued that despite some concern, the two questions posed in the Supreme Court’s order do not indicate that the justices are looking for a way out. They are ready to rule. Before we discuss the substance on which the justices will rule, let’s review the four cases that will decide the marriage equality question.

This matters because not all cases are fungible. Some come with better facts, others come with messy complications; some come with sympathetic plaintiffs, others have unfortunate optics. Especially when it comes to appellate review, the record on appeal can even tilt the outcome of the case. Plus, the cases are fun to talk about at nerdy cocktail parties.

Bourke v. Beshear is the Kentucky case and it was one of the earlier (though not the earliest) post-Windsor pro-equality decisions from a federal district court. It is about both the right to have a valid out-of-state marriage recognized in a home state and Kentucky’s own in-state ban. The judge, the Honorable John G. Heyburn, relied heavily on Windsor and found that Kentucky’s marriage laws discriminated against gay persons in violation of the Equal Protection Clause as applied to the states. Using rational basis review — the lowest form of scrutiny that only requires a rational connection between a law and a legitimate government objective — the court said there was no rational reason to treat gays this way. He struck down the anti-recognition law.

Authored By Ari Ezra Waldman – See the Full Story at Towleroad.com

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New Poll Shows 7% of LGBT Community Opposes Marriage Equality

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

titleAn interesting new poll shows that a small sliver of the US LGBT population opposes marriage equality.

The Washington Post reports:

A new chart from Pew, based on 2013 data, shows that 7 percent of LGBT Americans said they oppose same-sex marriage. And another 18 percent said they favor it, but that they didn’t feel strongly. Perhaps most striking, 39 percent of the LGBT community said the marriage fight was taking focus off other issues of import to them.

Opposition to gay marriage in the LGBT community, such as it exists, is driven by three groups: LGBT blacks, LGBT Republicans, and bisexual Americans.

While 12 percent of the black LGBT community opposed gay marriage, nearly one in five (19 percent) Republicans did, too. Only 45 percent of LGBT Republicans said they strongly favored gay marriage — the lowest of any group. Fifty-eight percent of LGBT blacks said they strongly favor it.

FT_15.01.23_LGBT-2

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A Best-Case, Worst-Case Look at the Supreme Court’s Options

Monday, January 26th, 2015

US Supreme Court Color

In just a few months, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in four marriage equality cases, and while it’s impossible to accurately predict how the nine justices may rule, it’s also impossible to avoid speculating. This much is certain: Whatever the court decides will be the most important turning point ever seen in the marriage equality battle — and will radically alter the lives of millions of people.

What Exactly Will the Court Decide?

The court is going to focus on two questions, asking attorneys on both sides to address the inquiries with the merits of their individual cases. Those questions are:

Does the Constitution require states to issue licenses to same-sex couples?

Does the Constitution require states to recognize out-of-state marriage licenses from jurisdictions with marriage equality?

These questions may seem straightforward, but the court’s answer could be (and probably will be) more than just a yes or no. When the justices rule, a complex decision could settle those questions while also providing detailed guidance for future litigation. That’s one reason why it’s so hard to predict: there are an infinite number of ways the justices can answer even the simplest of questions.

Authored By Matt Baume – See the Full Story at The Advocate

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Marriage Equality Round-Up – US Supreme Court Edition

Saturday, January 17th, 2015

US Supreme Court Color

There’s a lot going on around the US Supreme Court’s decision to take five marriage equality cases from the Sixth Circuit. Here’s a wrap-up of the current news and analysis

USA: The hearing will be held in April. full story

USA: The ACLU looks at where we’re at and how we got here. full story

USA: Time Magazine looks at the court’s options in the case. full story

USA: Lambda Legal asks “what happens if we lose?” full story

USA: New Now Next profiles the couples in the four cases. full story

USA: Just like the last time, it probably all comes down to Justice Kennedy. full story

USA: Not so fast, says the New Republic – Chief Justice Roberts may have a role to play too. full story

USA: Time also looks at the Supreme Court’s own history with the issue. full story

USA: Garrett Epps at The Atlantic looks at the odds. full story

USA: Time recaps what five of the Justices have written or said about marriage equality in the past. full story

USA: Prop 8 attorney David Boies thinks marriage equality will win out at the Court. full story

USA: Attorney General Eric Holder says he will file a brief with the Court in favor of marriage equality. full story

USA: While announcing the Court’s decision to take the cases, Fox News anchor Shepard Smith slammed the “continuing discrimination” by states that are still fighting same-sex marriage full story

USA: Steve Sanders at ScotusBlog looks at the issue of “animus” in the state bans and the upcoming decisions. full story

USA, Michigan: The plaintiffs here say they are in awe that the Court has decided to take up their case. full story

USA, Texas: Neel Lane, attorney the plaintiffs in the Texas marriage equality case, is calling on the three judge panel to issue a ruling even though the Supremes have now taken four marriage equality cases. full story

USA, Alaska: Attorney General Craig Richards said he would suspend his hopeless appeal of the decision striking down the state’s ban while the Supremes consider the issue. full story