usa

...now browsing by tag

 
 

New US Marriage Equality Maps

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

We have three new US marriage equality maps for you. For the first time (at least for me) it really looks like the marriage equality states are dominant on the map:

Pew Forum has a great interactive map (with a slider) showing marriage equality by state over time. See the Interactive Map

Pew Map

Think Progress also has a new marriage equality map. full story

Think Progress Map

Wikipedia has a new marriage equality map too. full story

Wikipedia Map

Enjoy!

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

New Poll Refutes Purported “Drop” In Marriage Equality Support

Friday, October 17th, 2014

titleA new poll shows strong support for the US Supreme Court action on marriage equality, mirroring an earlier poll by the same organization on marriage equality in general.

ABC News reports:

Most Americans in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll support the recent U.S. Supreme Court action allowing gay marriages to go forward in several states – including a bare majority in the 11 states in which such marriages have begun in the past week and a half. Overall, 56 percent of Americans support the court’s action, while 38 percent oppose it – exactly matching opinions on whether or not gay marriage should be legal, asked in an ABC/Post poll in June. These results reflect the public’s dramatic shift in support of gay marriage the past decade.

Even the 11 states affected by the non-decision decision show majority support, at 51%. But more importantly, this poll refutes the results of an earlier Pew Poll, which seemed to show a drop in national marriage equality support. That poll is looking more and more like an outlier.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

New Maps Show How Far We Have to Go on Transgender Rights in the US

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

The fight for marriage equality in the US may be almost over, but the fight for transgender rights is just starting.

Vocative has five maps and the story:

…as important as visibility is for creating awareness, it’s just one step toward equality. For all the positive changes taking place, transgender Americans are still treated as lesser-thans when it comes to policy and legislation that affords them legal rights and protections. “The recent media attention that the trans community has received is a helpful starting point for working toward greater rights and equal rights,” says Arli Christian, policy counsel at the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE). “Now we have all of these legal and policy changes that really need to be made. And looking at the number of states that have more accessible trans policies versus the states that need to improve their policies, we have a ways to go.”

Here are a couple of the maps to back up that point.

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 10.38.11 AM

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 10.36.25 AM

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

Final Answer on US Marriage Equality in 2015?

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

US Supreme Court ColorThe unexpected decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to refuse to consider rulings favorable to marriage equality from three separate circuit courts has shaken up the timeline for an expected resolution of the issue, but legal observers still predict a nationwide answer by the end of 2015.

Before last week, the assumption was the Supreme Court would take a lawsuit seeking marriage equality to deliver a decision binding on all 50 states by the middle of next year. Now, although the sense of timing is just about the same or just slightly longer, observers say the same goal can be achieved after a series of circuit court rulings in favor of marriage equality.

James Esseks, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s LGBT Project, envisioned the possibility of each of the outstanding circuit courts without marriage equality — the Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Eleventh — ruling unanimously in favor of gay nuptials by fall 2015. “And if that happens, I don’t think the Supreme Court takes the issue, I think they just let all the circuit courts fall in line, and then we’ve got a national rule that’s just kind of a whole series of decisions,” Esseks said.

Authored By Chris Johnson – See the Full Story at The Washington Blade

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

Do We Even Need the Supreme Court to Rule on Marriage Equality?

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

US Supreme Court ColorBack in June, I argued that there may never be a need for the Supreme Court to take a marriage equality case.

We have marriage rights in Washington, Oregon, California, New Mexico, Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Utah, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Indiana, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. The Ninth Circuit just declared the bans on marriage equality in Idaho and Nevada unconstitutional. Both states will have to comply in short order. Since there is no reason to stay those cases given the Supreme Court’s recent denials of review, we will soon have marriage equality in at least 32 states!

The Supreme Court has denied review in cases out of the Fourth, Seventh, and Tenth Circuits. That leaves marriage equality lawsuits on appeal at the Fifth (the Texas case) and Sixth (the Michigan case). Marriage equality is almost a sure bet in, at least, the entire Ninth Circuit now. At some point, the conventional wisdom says, all these cases will lead back to the Supreme Court.

Not necessarily. Looking at the map and our string of marriage equality victories, I wonder whether we will need the Supreme Court at all. A nationwide freedom to marry could be a fait accompli without five justices of the Supreme Court.

Authored By Ari Ezra Waldman – See the Full Story at Towleroad.com

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

Supreme Court Could Choose a Marriage Equality Case Tomorrow

Sunday, September 28th, 2014

US Supreme Court ColorTomorrow is the first day the US Supreme Court could actually choose a case or cases in the marriage equality fight this year.

NBC News reports:

The justices, who will meet in a closed-door conference on Monday, will consider whether to hear any of three same-sex marriage lawsuits during the next term, which officially starts Oct. 6. If they decide to review one or more of the cases, a ruling could be reached by July on whether same-sex marriage must be allowed nationwide. If they choose not to hear the cases, the decision would allow gay nuptials in the ten states covered by the three lawsuits. The court could also wait for a circuit court to disagree with the others and support the state bans. The justice have until January 2015 to make their decision. Both opponents and supporters of gay marriage predict that the justices will hear at least one of the cases.

Which case do you think they will take, if any? Utah, Oklahoma, or Virginia?

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

New Poll Shows Three Quarters Want to Keep Marriage Equality Law

Sunday, September 28th, 2014

titleSome great new polling out of France this morning on marriage equality.

Pink News reports:

“…a poll today may crush the hopes of those wishing to block same-sex marriage – as a majority of UMP members now support keeping the law, as well as an overwhelming majority of the French public. 56 percent of UMP voters now support keeping the law in place, despite many being fiercely opposed before the law was implemented, with just 44 percent wanting it repealed. Across the public, at large, 73 percent now want the law to remain in place, with just 26 percent opposed and 1 percent unsure. Over 7000 same-sex couples married in France last year, with Paris alone recently celebrating its 2000th marriage – meaning any attempt to repeal the law would likely be a bureaucratic nightmare.”

Looks like marriage equality is here to stay in France, regardless of what Sarkozy says.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

US Marriage Equality Support Reaches 56%, Opposition Drops to 37%

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

titleA new poll shows that opposition to marriage equality has dropped to a new low.

Pink News reports:

The New York Times/CBS poll, released this week, asked voters: “Do you think it should be legal or not legal for same-sex couples to marry?” The long-running poll recorded 56% of people in favour of same-sex marriage across the US, while just 37% now oppose it. The poll, which has run with the same wording for several years, registered a three-point drop in opposition from a similar poll conducted in July this year, when 40% of people had still opposed same-sex marriage. The 37% finding also demonstrates a sharp fall in opposition from just two years ago, with a July 2012 poll finding 44% opposition.

I wonder what those 7% in the middle are thinking?

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

New Group “Evangelicals for Marriage Equality” Formed

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

 Evangelicals for Marriage Equality ad

There’s a new group of evangelicals supporting marriage equality.

The Dallas Voice reports:

Evangelicals for Marriage Equality is serious and group spokesman Brandon Robertson has some impressive statistics to back him up: A third of evangelicals 34 to 48 support marriage equality and 43 percent of those 18 to 33 support marriage equality, according to Robertson. The group planned to launch with an ad that was rejected by Christianity Today. “There are hundreds of verses in the Bible that talk about love. There aren’t any that talk about the definition of civil marriage,” the ad reads. Whoa. That’s kind of racy for Christianity Today. How dare these evangelical extremists actually read the Bible.

More and more religious groups are supporting marriage equality, and it’s great to see some evangelicals jumping on the bandwagon!

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

What Happens if the Supreme Court Doesn’t Take a Marriage Equality Case?

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

Matt BaumeAlthough it seems unlikely, it’s possible the US Supreme Court will decline to take any of the marriage equality cases before it this year. So what happens then?

Matt Baume at the Advocate explains:

It’s hard to imagine, but the court could choose to deny a writ of certiorari for the petitions currently pending and anticipated over the next few months. If it did so, the impact would be immediate and huge. The most significant effect would be the lifting of stays in states where marriage bans have been overturned. Courts had imposed those stays pending final resolution of the cases at the Supreme Court as a last resort. Without that last resort, pro-marriage equality rulings would become the law of the land in Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Indiana. Those states alone would account for a massive surge in the number of Americans in marriage equality states. The population of those states adds up to a little over 27 million people. But it wouldn’t stop there. The victories in those states were at the appellate circuit level, which means the rulings would become precedent in neighboring states encompassed by the circuit as well.

Basically, marriage equality would become the law of the land immediately or shortly thereafter for about 65 million people, in the following states: Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. And if the expected Ninth Circuit ruling is favorable, add Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, and Nevada to that list.

By my count, that pushes the total to 35 states, well over a majority of the country.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.