New Mexico

...now browsing by category

New Mexico LGBT rights and marriage equality

 

Featured Gay Friendly Wedding Vendor: Hacienda Vargas Bed and Breakfast, Algodones, New Mexico

Monday, January 19th, 2015

Hacienda Vargas Bed and Breakfast

Periodically we’ll feature one of our vendors here to let our readers know about some great people who can help you plan the perfect wedding.

Gay Wedding Event Location in Algodones, NM, USA. Conveniently located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe in the village of Algodones, we are a historic inn with a romantic chapel. We specialize in catering to just the couple by providing witnesses and an officient in an intimate candelight ceremony in our chapel or can accommodate small events up to 20 people indoors or up to 150 in an outdoor garden setting. We have 7 rooms, all with private entrances and bathrooms.

See the Hacienda Vargas Expanded Listing on Purple Unions Here

Gay Friendly Wedding Vendors in New Mexico

Featured Gay Friendly Wedding Vendor: Reverend Susan Varon, Taos, New Mexico

Monday, October 13th, 2014

Rev. Susan Varon - TaosPeriodically we’ll feature one of our vendors here to let our readers know about some great people who can help you plan the perfect wedding.

Gay Wedding Officiants in Taos, NM, USA. I create, with you, a joyful, one-of-a-kind ceremony of love. Spiritual or romantic, traditional or light-hearted–secular, ecumenical, or multicultural. Please see the two sample weddings on my website, as well as the many Testimonials!

See Reverend Susan’s Expanded Listing on Purple Unions Here

Gay Friendly Wedding Vendors in New Mexico

Featured Gay Friendly Honeymoon Lodging: Casa Montoya, Taos, New Mexico

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Casa Montoya - Taos, New MexicoPeriodically we’ll feature one of our vendors here to let our readers know about some great people who can help you plan the perfect wedding.

Gay Wedding Honeymoon Lodging in Taos, NM, USA. Walk to the Historic Taos Plaza – Private hot tub surrounded by tall fence, fireplace, A/C, 1 bedroom with marvelous king bed, 1 bathroom with tub. Casa Montoya is a very romantic, charming adobe house 3 blocks from the Plaza. Large fully equipped kitchen has large refrigerator/freezer and dishwasher. Dine in the kitchen, dining area or patio, or walk to the wonderful restaurants nearby. Washer/dryer. Linens, towels, wood/kindling supplied. Driveway parking.

See the Casa Montoya Expanded Listing on Purple Unions Here

Gay Friendly Wedding Vendors in New Mexico

USA, New Mexico: Analysis of the Supreme Court’s Refusal To Take Up Photographer’s Case

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

US Supreme CourtYesterday, the US Supreme Court turned away the case of a NM photographer who refused to take photos at a gay couple’s wedding.

Ian Millhiser at Think Progress has some insights:

If anything can be read into the Court’s decision not to hear the Elane Photography case, however, it is probably that the Court’s conservative wing was unwilling to take this bet. The Court’s four more liberal members had no reason to disturb the New Mexico Supreme Court’s decision — they probably agree with it — and the four most conservative justices may have decided to give this case a miss because they were worried that Kennedy would join the liberals if forced to decide Elane Photography… While Elane Photography is technically a free speech case and not a religious liberty case, it also presents the question of whether a religious business owner can ignore a business regulation. So if Kennedy was unwilling to decide Hobby Lobby in a way that would allow religious objections to trump anti-discrimination law, it is likely that he would have had the same concern in Elane Photography. That may have been enough to convince his fellow conservatives to avoid Elane Photography.

Lisa Keen at Keen News agrees:

The photographer had claimed that she had religious beliefs that compelled her to refuse accommodations to the lesbian couple, and the case was viewed as one of many disputes heading to the U.S. high court that pitted religious beliefs against non-discrimination laws. But the case was never pitched as a free exercise case and that may be why the Supreme Court didn’t take it, said Lambda Legal Senior Counsel Jenny Pizer. Tobias Wolff, an attorney helping represent the lesbian couple, said, “No court in the United States has ever found that a business selling commercial services to the general public has a First Amendment right to turn away customers on a discriminatory basis.”

When the case began, the was no marriage equality in the state. Now, as it ends with a whimper, New Mexico has embraced the right of gays and lesbians to marry. Now we await the court’s decision in the Hobby Lobby case, which could have profound effects on the religious liberty vs. gay rights arguments in the US.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources in New Mexico.

USA, New Mexico: Supreme Court Won’t Hear Photographer’s Case

Monday, April 7th, 2014

US Supreme CourtThe US Supreme Court has just turned away the case of a New Mexico Photographer who was sued after she refused to photograph a same-sex wedding.

Equality on Trial reports:

The Court had considered the petition over several conferences, and this morning, they officially denied certiorari, meaning that the unanimous New Mexico Supreme Court decision against the business will remain in effect in the state. The challenge was brought by the photography business, Elane Photography, after they declined to photograph a same-sex commitment ceremony (before same-sex marriage was legal in the state) and were cited under the state’s public accommodations law, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, among other things.

Will this and the Mozilla flap rekindle the fire under those Right to Discriminate bills that were recently shot down in many states across the country?

Find more articles and gay wedding resources in New Mexico.

USA, New Mexico: Two Judges Quit Officiating Weddings to Protest Marriage Equality

Friday, February 21st, 2014

New Mexico MapTwo judges in Southeastern New Mexico have announced that they will no longer officiate any weddings to avoid having to marry same sex couples.

KRWG reports:

Judges in two southeastern New Mexico counties say they will no longer officiate weddings after the state’s high court ruled in favor of marriage equality. The Carlsbad Current-Argus reports that judges in Eddy and Chaves Counties recently announced they won’t officiate civil marriage ceremonies for straight or same-sex couples. In December, the New Mexico Supreme Court decided it was unconstitutional to deny marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples. Officials in both counties say the decision was made a few months ago.

It’s the kind of tantrum that any 5 year old child would be proud of. If I can’t have it my way, I won’t do it at all! Judges in the state are not required to officiate at weddings, but county clerks must issue licenses to same sex couples.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources in New Mexico.

Featured Gay Friendly Wedding Vendor: Four Kachinas B&B Inn, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Saturday, February 15th, 2014

Four Kachinas B&B Inn - Santa Fe, New MexicoPeriodically we’ll feature one of our vendors here to let our readers know about some great people who can help you plan the perfect wedding.

Gay Wedding Honeymoon Lodging in Santa Fe, NM, USA. Enjoy your stay at one of Santa Fe’s finest bed and breakfast inns located within Santa Fe’s historic district and an easy walk to museums, world class shopping, fine dining, numerous art galleries and interesting historical sites. The inn features 6 rooms richly decorated with handcrafted furniture, fine art and quality linens and all rooms have private baths. Our rooms have adjoining garden patios.

See the Four Kachinas B&B Inn Expanded Listing on Purple Unions Here

Gay Friendly New Mexico Wedding Vendors

Featured Gay Friendly Wedding Vendor: Ceremonies in Nature, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

Ceremonies in Nature  - Truth or Consequences, New MexicoPeriodically we’ll feature one of our vendors here to let our readers know about some great people who can help you plan the perfect wedding.

Gay Wedding Officiants in Truth or Consequences, NM, USA. For those who want more than the ordinary wedding ceremony, let Reverend Celeste help orchestrate a wedding that reflects your beliefs and lifestyle. Unique optional rituals, e.g. Past/Present/Future or Family Sand-blending into Unity Vase, Native American Blanket ritual, Ribbons of Hope & Wishes. Digital photos on c.d. available.

See the Ceremonies in Nature
Expanded Listing on Purple Unions Here

Gay Friendly Wedding Vendors in New Mexico

USA, New Mexico: Governor Martinez Will Not Push for Marriage Equality Ban

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

New Mexico Governor Susana MartinezNew Mexico Governor Susana Martinez says marriage equality is now the “law of the land”, and will not push for gay marriage ban in her state.

The Advocate reports:

Last summer, as several New Mexico counties began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, Martinez repeatedly said she believed voters should have the final say on legal recognition of such marriages. But in a news conference Monday, she said she wouldn’t advocate for an anti-marriage equality constitutional amendment to go before the electorate. “I think what I said before was that yes, the people should have decided on it, but the Supreme Court has decided,” she said, according to the Santa Fe New Mexican. “And it’s now the law of the land.” Asked if that meant she wouldn’t support efforts to place the question on the ballot, she said, “It’s the law of the land. The Supreme Court has spoken.”

At last, one conservative politician with the sense to see where things are going. It’s refreshing to see some sense of finality in New Mexico.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources in New Mexico.

USA, New Mexico: GOP Threatens Constitutional Marriage Equality Ban

Saturday, December 21st, 2013

New Mexico MapOn to our second marriage equality state of the week, New Mexico!

In the wake of the marriage equality ruling there, the County Clerk and her deputy both resigned rather than issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

The Advocate reports:

Roosevelt County clerk Donna Carpenter and her lead deputy, Janet Collins, turned in their resignations this morning, according to ProgressNowNM, a progressive advocacy group that fought for marriage equality. Sources confirmed to the group that the two officials’ objections to same-sex marriage were behind the move.

The Navajo Nation, within the state of New Mexico, said the ruling has no effect on its own ban on same sex weddings, for now.

LGBTQ nation reports:

A Navajo Nation official says the tribe’s own law prohibiting same-sex marriage isn’t affected by the New Mexico Supreme Court’s decision legalizing marriage for gay and lesbian couples in New Mexico. Navajo-NationDeswood Tome, an adviser to Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly, told The Daily Times that the tribe’s own law prohibiting same-sex marriage still stands. “We are upholding the law as currently enacted,” Tome said.

State Senator William Sharer, a longtime marriage equality opponent, is vowing to push for a constitutional ban on marriage equality.

On Top Magazine reports:

New Mexico State Senator William Sharer has introduced legislation aimed at altering the state’s constitution to define marriage as a heterosexual union. Sharer filed his bill Thursday in reaction to a New Mexico Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay marriage in the state.

The Republican lawmaker told ABC Albuquerque affiliate KOAT that he drafted the proposed amendment before the court issued its ruling. “I had it drafted weeks ago and it was just sitting there waiting until I said go,” Sharer said. “[Gay marriage opponents] need to get on the phone and start calling and emailing their legislators.”

Yeah, good luck with that. They’re having a hard time getting a new constitutional ban off the ground in Indiana, and Indiana is a much redder state than New Mexico.

The Week thinks the ruling may not have much affect on other states:

But though the court cited the Supreme Court decision that struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in its own opinion, it also noted that its interpretation of that and other rulings did not necessarily mean other states should follow suit. The court wrote: Interpreting our statutes to authorize committed same-gender couples to enter into civil marriage will grant them the rights and privileges available to opposite-gender married couples in approximately one thousand statutes and federal regulations that refer to a person’s marital status, thereby avoiding a constitutional challenge on that basis.

And Scottie Thomaston at Equality on Trial analyzes the ruling:

In summary, the court held that the current marriage laws should be read the way the legislature intended, and that means they apply only to opposite-sex couples and same-sex marriage isn’t allowed by statute. Then the court determined that the ban is a classification based on sexual orientation and under equal protection review, classifications on that type should be based on “intermediate scrutiny”, a form of heightened judicial scrutiny. Instead of gay plaintiffs bringing a lawsuit and having to explain why every rationale is invalid (the most lenient standard of judicial review), under intermediate scrutiny, the state defendants would have to explain how the law bears a substantial relationship to an important government objective. And under that standard, the court held the defenses for the ban don’t hold up, so the ban is unconstitutional.

Predictably, the Republican governor Susana Martinez was not happy with the ruling.

On Top Magazine reports:

Martinez said in statement that the issue “should have been settled by a vote of the people. Instead, the Supreme Court stepped in and rendered their decision.” “As we move forward, I am hopeful that we will not be divided, as we must come together to tackle very pressing issues,” she added.

Ever notice how slippery our opponents are on this issue? If we win the courts, it should’ve been decided by the legislature or the people. If people vote for it, the legislature should vote to undo it. If the legislature votes for it, it should be undone by the courts or should’ve been sent to a vote of the people. I’m beginning to think the only way we’d ever really win the argument is if we could win a state by all three methods simultaneously.

In any case, marriage equality is the law the land in New Mexico and Utah, for now. What an amazing week.

Find more articles and gay wedding resources in New Mexico.