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The Lay of the Land Post-Windsor and –Perry

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

With marriage equality now coming to Illinois and Hawaii, nearly 40% of the country lives in a marriage equality state. But just how federal and state governments will navigate the still-unsettled reality (and consequences) of marriage equality remains an open question.

Although Windsor invalidated Section 3 of DOMA, it left Section 2 in place, which allows states to refuse to recognize same gender marriages performed in other states. Marriages are not judgments or orders, and are therefore not entitled to equality under constitutional principles of full faith and credit among the states. This has the potential to impact benefits, parental rights, divorce, and other issues for same-sex couples depending on where they marry and where they live.

Read the full story on the MEUSA news blog…

Colorado, USA: Financial Ramifications of the New Civil Unions Law for Gay Couples

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

ColoradoNow that Colorado’s civil unions bill has been signed into law, what are the financial changes gay and lesbian couples will see if they enter into one? Heather Draper at BizJournals.com takes a look:

The biggest financial changes will come for state employees and for local government, firefighter and police pension plans, Foster said. “We are now able to speak with state employees about new options available to them,” he said. “They now have group health insurance benefits available to their civil-union spouse, and they can put their civil-union spouse as a beneficiary on their retirement plan.” And civil-union spouses will now be eligible for survivor benefits in local government, firefighter and police pension plans.

The article also reminds us that DOMA prevents couples in a civil union from receiving any federal benefits normally associated with marriage

USA: Is Marriage Equality Good or Bad for Your Finances?

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

USA: Is Marriage Equality Good or Bad for Your Finances?“So I’ve met my future husband, I’ve found the place for our dream wedding. Financially speaking, should we run off to one of the states where it is legal to get married and tie the knot?” This was the beginning of a conversation I recently had with a gay couple who are both friends and clients of mine.

First, I gave a big resounding yes to the wedding. But there was quite a bit more to think about and discuss when it comes to the pros and cons of making the nuptials official with any state government.

I often hear from many gay-married couples that they just assume they now have all the rights and protections that their straight counterparts take for granted. But sadly this isn’t the case. In a purely financial sense, marriage as a gay couple really has a lot more cons than pros.

Authored By David Rae – See the Full Story at The Advocate

Find more articles and gay wedding resources.

To subscribe to this blog, use the rss feed on the right, or use the form at right to join our email list. You can also email us at info@purpleunions.com. Or find us on Facebook. We’re also tweeting daily at http://www.twitter.com/gaymarriagewatc.

NY: Financial Ramifications for Marriage Equality

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

The State of New York gives 1,324 rights and responsibilities as a wedding gift to couples who marry. With same-sex couples about to enter that mix, they will soon be able to access this diverse list for the first time.

Take, for instance, the transfer of property. Previously, if a same-sex couple lived in a house, and the deed was only in the name of one partner, the other parter would lose a home if there was no will. “You wouldn’t be able to inherit your own house. Married people do, automatically,” says Executive Director Ross Levi of the Empire State Pride Agenda.

If a surviving partner did get the house, it would come with a major tax bill that is waived for spouses. Same-sex couples will now enjoy the marital exemption on the state side, but will stay pay federally. “Because of the federal Defense Of Marriage Act, which doesn’t recognize those marriages for any federal purposes,” says Levi.

Full Story from NY1

Click here for gay marriage resources in New York.

To subscribe to this blog, use the rss feed on the right, or use the form at right to join our email list. You can also email us at info@purpleunions.com. Or find us on Facebook – just search for Gay Marriage Watch (you’ll see our b/w wedding pic overlooking the Ferry Building and Bay Bridge in SF). We’re also tweeting daily at http://www.twitter.com/gaymarriagewatc.

NY: How Marriage Equality Will Change the Financial Lives of Gay Couples

Saturday, June 25th, 2011

Couples may marry for love, but the partnership is also an economic one. And now that New York has become the sixth state to perform same-sex marriage, couples who tie the knot here will gain a variety of financial benefits and legal rights.

Some of the changes will be significant. While New York had already recognized same-sex marriages performed elsewhere, that recognition didn’t extend to state income taxes. Now, couples who marry and live in New York will be able to file their state tax returns jointly. Wealthier couples may end up paying more in taxes, but families with lower incomes may owe less.

Couples who decide to marry will also be first in line to inherit their spouses’ assets, even in the absence of a will. They’ll gain an array of smaller benefits as well, down to the ability to transfer a lobstering license.

Full Story from The New York Times

Click here for gay marriage resources in New York.

To subscribe to this blog, use the rss feed on the right, or use the form at right to join our email list. You can also email us at info@purpleunions.com. Or find us on Facebook – just search for Gay Marriage Watch (you’ll see our b/w wedding pic overlooking the Ferry Building and Bay Bridge in SF). We’re also tweeting daily at http://www.twitter.com/gaymarriagewatc.