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Why Don’t the LGBT and African American Communities Stand Together?

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

Hands

Matthew was tied to a fence in rural Wyoming after being pistol-whipped and tortured — left to die. The moment we heard about his death, long before it was ever classified as a hate crime, in the very pits of our stomachs we knew that’s exactly what it was. But some voices, apparently unfazed by the horror of the crime, tried to rationalize that he must have created “gay panic” by coming onto his attackers.

Bryan’s unconscious, battered body was found in the Castro near dawn, badly beaten. Days later he was removed from life support. While some suggested he was probably just a victim of robbery, the immediate watery eyes and shudder felt by gays and lesbians evoked a knowing that something far more sinister caused his death.

Marichuy, a transgender woman detained among men in an Arizona immigration detention center, was raped — even after she had reported being harassed, bullied and threatened with rape. Many suggested she got what she deserved for her non-normative gender expression. Others, as is the case for many women who are raped, speculated about what she must have done to deserve it.

Those who have themselves survived such crimes wept aloud — or they wept quietly, alone.

Michael, an unarmed young, black man of considerable stature, was gunned down by a police officer in Missouri. Many quickly labeled the killing as justified, because the young man might have stolen something earlier in the day, or because he probably did something to deserve it — while the hearts of the black community broke. Again.

Authored By Todd Whitley – See the Full Story at The Dallas Voice

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Should Bisexuals Forego Marriage Until Everyone Can Marry?

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Should Bisexuals Forego Marriage Until Everyone Can Marry?This is the first in an ongoing conversation between two bisexual activists. A.J. Walkley and Lauren Michelle Kinsey are both monogamous, bisexual, cisgender females who are in long-term relationships. A.J. is in a relationship with a cisgender male, and Lauren is in a relationship with a cisgender female. Both A.J. and Lauren are committed to remaining visible as bisexuals in spite of society’s tendency to want to label A.J. as heterosexual and Lauren as a lesbian. Together they came up with the idea for “Bi the Bi: Two Bi Writers on Big Bi Issues” as a way to help eliminate stereotypes and bias against people in the bisexual community.

Question: Should bisexual people in the United States who are in opposite-sex relationships forego marriage until all people have the right to marry the person they love?

A.J.: I have thought long and hard about this question as the relationship I am currently in has gotten more serious and long-term. I am in an opposite-sex relationship with a cisgender male going on four years now. Marriage is a subject that is never far from our minds, nor my mother’s, for that matter. For many it seems like the next logical step for us to take. I live in Arizona, and I keep thinking about what that would mean if, instead of my boyfriend, I was in a same-sex relationship. If marriage was something we both wanted, it wouldn’t matter: We couldn’t get married, period. I am a staunch supporter of marriage equality for all, and no matter who I am with at a given point, a large part of me feels like I should not enter into the institution of marriage until everyone is allowed. I don’t intend to speak for all bisexual people, but for me personally, I think I would feel a little guilty if I were to get married right now.

See the Full Story at The Huffington Post

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We Won’t Marry Until Gay Couples Can

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

This April, after many years together, we decided to get engaged. Most engagements are marked with a fabulous ring and a bended knee, but we consider ourselves fairly nontraditional, so that just wasn’t for us. We really wanted something unique that spoke to what we care about as a couple. We wanted to create a new symbol of love to mark this huge “next step” our life together was taking.

We came up with a pledge. We pledged publicly to our friends and family that we would not marry until Oregon allows gay couples to marry.

We know full well, given that we both make barely over minimum wage and have student loans to pay, that this is a considerable financial risk. We think that is what makes it so crucial. We couldn’t help but think of gay couples who are just like us and rely on each other for everything.

Full Story from The Huffington Post

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IL: Straight Couples Showing Solidarity With Gay Friends By Getting Civil Unions

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Illinois Civil UnionsLisa Berube, 27, and her spouse Matt Churilla, 29, opted for a civil union license when they said “I do” at Chicago City Hall this year in a show of “solidarity” with gay couples across Illinois who aren’t legally allowed to get married.

“Part of the reason we chose a civil union over a marriage or over a marriage license was to show solidarity,” Berube said. “It was important for us to be able to define family relationships on our own terms. Marriage didn’t do that for us. Marriage seemed more exclusionary.”

Berube and Churilla, who live in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood, are among a small fraction of opposite sex couples who obtained civil union licenses in Cook County when the new statewide law allowing civil unions kicked in June 1. County Clerk David Orr’s office, which issues marriage and civil union licenses, launched a survey in September to find out why the couples – who can legally get married – opted for civil unions.

Full Story from the Sun Times

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