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NY: High Court Recognizes VT Civil Union for Parenting Rights

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

New York’s highest court ruled that a Vermont civil union establishes parental rights for the non-biological parent. The ruling, in the case brought by Lambda Legal, was unanimous. The court, however, did not overrule a 1991 decision that said only biological or adoptive parents may seek custody and visitation rights.

However, the latest ruling strengthens recognition of same-sex relationships in a state that doesn’t issue marriage licenses to gay and lesbian ouples. In September 2009, Vermont’s marriage equality law replaced civil unions. Last year, a marriage equality law proposed by New York’s governor passed the Assembly but failed in the Senate. New York does recognize marriages and civil unions performed elsewhere, thanks to an executive order and several legal decisions.

In a related case, the court ruled 4-3 that a woman is entitled to seek child support from her former partner. The partner is not the biological parent, but the couple raised the child together until they split.

[End of Article]

Full Story from the Dallas Voice

Click here for gay marriage resources in New York.

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VT: 10th Anniversary of Vermont’s Civil Unions Law

Monday, April 19th, 2010

At the end of this month, Vermont will mark ten years since civil unions were adopted for gay and lesbian couples. As VPR’s Ross Sneyd reports, the importance of the law is still the subject of debate.

(Sneyd) The civil union law itself didn’t even survive to its 10th birthday. It was replaced a year ago when the Legislature expanded the definition of marriage to include same-sex couples. But there’s still lively debate among people who were involved in 2000 about whether it was appropriate to settle for something less than advocates really wanted. Beth Robinson is a lawyer and has been the leader of the Vermont Freedom to Marry Task Force.

(Robinson) “This is a situation where we had a court decision. And we had a bill that did the absolute bare minimum that could possibly have been done in light of what the court decision was.”

Full Story from VPR

Click here for gay marriage resources.

To subscribe to this blog, use the rss feed on the right, or use the form at right to join our email list. You can also email us at info@purpleunions.com. Or find us on Facebook – just search for Gay Marriage Watch (you’ll see our b/w wedding pic overlooking the Ferry Building and Bay Bridge in SF). We’re also tweeting daily at http://www.twitter.com/gaymarriagewatc.